Monday, 9 June 2014

American Abstract Expressionism and Jazz

We listened to

WEST END BLUES : LOUIS ARMSTRONG, JUNE 29TH 1928, CHICAGO

Louis Armstrong and his Hot Five: Armstrong on trumpet; Fred Robinson, trombone; Jimmy Strong, clarinet; Earl Hines, piano; Mancy Cara, banjo, Zutty Singleton drums.

and

Ornette Coleman, Free Jazz, 1960, Atlantic
Don Cherry (pocket tp) Freddie Hubbard (tp) Eric Dolphy (bcl) Ornette Coleman (as) Charlie Haden, Scott LaFaro (b) Ed Blackwell, Billy Higgins (d)  NYC, December 21, 1960

On Jazz see
Shipton, A., 2008. A New History of Jazz, Revised edition edition. ed. Continuum International Publishing Group Ltd., New York.
Ward, G., Burns, K., 2000. Jazz: an Illustrated History, 1 edition. ed. Alfred A Knopf, New York.

Jackson Pollock CD from MoMa in New York.

Action Painting: “At a certain moment the canvas began to appear to one American painter after another as an arena in which to act - rather than as a space in which to reproduce, redesign, analyse or “express” an object, actual or imagined. What was to go on the canvas was not a picture but an event.The painter no longer approached his easel with an image in his mind; he went up to it with material in his hand to do something to that piece of material in front of him. The image would be the result of this encounter.” 
Harold Rosenberg 1951, ART NEWS, REPRINTED ART IN THEORY, EDS. HARRISON AND WOODS P.581

Read
Polcari, S., 1993. Abstract Expressionism and the Modern Experience, New edition edition. ed. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge England; New York.
The New Orleans Museum of Art published a guide to Art and All that Jazz which you may find useful. Find it here.



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